Disclaimer:  Star Trek is the property of Paramount/Viacom.  This story is copyright (c) 2006 by SterJulie.  Rated G. 

 

My Little Leprechaun

Ster Julie

 

Mother, what is the meaning of these figures?

Ah! You have discovered the wee folk.

Wee folk?

Aye, the Leprechauns.

They appear to be Vulcan in some of these images.

Ah, no, son.  Their ears may be pointed, but they are not Vulcans.  They be faeries.

Mother, your speech patterns are severely altered.  Are you unwell?

No, me boy.  I am merely celebrating my heritage.

Heritage?  Mother, you are a human from Earth.

I am much more than merely a human from Earth, child.  My father's fathers are descended from the Gray clan of the most beautiful country on the whole of Earth: Ireland, also known as the Emerald Island.

The Emerald Island?  Is it a crystalline formation?

No, sweet boy.  It is called "the Emerald Island" because everything is so green.

I still do not know anything about these creatures that you named lepir...

Leprechauns.

Leprechauns.

Aye.  Look it up on the computer.

It reads, "They usually take the form of an old man and enjoy partaking in mischief." What is mischief, Mother?

Check the dictionary.

"Mischief:  1. conduct that causes harm or trouble, often without meaning it; 2. harm, injury usually done by some person; 3. one who does harm, often just in fun; 4. merry teasing." Illogical.  This does not follow the way of cthia.  It is unseemly to derive pleasure by injuring others.

What else does it say of leprechauns?

"Their trade is that of a cobbler or shoemaker and they are often described as being seen working on a single shoe.  They are said to be very rich, having many treasure crocks buried during war-time.  While anyone keeps his eye fixed upon them, they cannot escape, but the moment the eye is withdrawn they vanish." They have a worthy trade of making footwear, and which seems to be a lucrative endeavor, so why do they make ... mischief?

Leprechauns have to resort to trickery and cunning to protect their vast fortunes.  That is why they are known as such mischief-makers.

Is it not honorable to share one's wealth with those in need, Mother?

Of course it is, my child, but people used to try and steal the leprechaun's wealth.  That is not honorable.

Do leprechauns really exist, Mother?

Oh, aye.  To a believer, they truly do exist.

Have you ever seen a leprechaun, Mother?

Indeed I have!

Really?

In fact, one sweet leprechaun boy came to live with me six years ago.

He did?  What did he look like?

Oh, he had a cap of shiny brown hair, and big brown eyes the color of melted chocolate.  His skin was a pale green and he had the cutest little pointed ears.

Mother!  You just described me.

Did I now?  Well then, my little leprechaun, since I have me eye on you, you will have to give me some of your gold.

I have no gold, Mother.

Ah, but you do.

I do?

Aye!  You have a treasure of beautiful smiles that make me very happy.

But Father says that Vulcans do not smile.

That is true, but you are human as well.  How can we make a compromise?

Perhaps I can smile for you on occasion, when Father is not home.

That would be satisfactory.

When would you want me to smile for you?

Tell you what, me boy.  You may smile for me on my birthday, and on one other day per year of your own choosing.  How is that?

That is satisfactory.  Do you wish to have you first smile now?

Oh, aye.  You owe me a smile for I still have me eye upon you...  Oh, Spock!  The sun just rose on your face fer sure, my son.  Thank you.

You are welcome, Mother, but the sun did not rise on my face.  It would have burned me up.

Silly boy!  I mean that the smile brought a brightness to your face.

Oh.  Why is that bell ringing?

Oh! That means our treat has finished baking.  Irish soda bread.

Irish?

Yes, everybody is Irish on Saint Patrick's Day.

I thought I was Vulcan.

You are, sweet boy, you are, but today we will celebrate that wee drop of human, Irish blood in you that makes you my little leprechaun.

 

END

 

**NOTE: Definition for mischief is from the Thorndike-Barnhhart Junior Dictionary, copyright 1962.  I'm sure many of you had the same one in grade school.  The leprechaun description and illustrations are from Wikipedia.